CHAMPLAIN BRIDGE CORRIDOR PROJECT

CHAMPLAIN BRIDGE CORRIDOR PROJECT


The Champlain Bridge Corridor Project will span the St. Lawrence River from Île-des-Sœurs to Brossard downstream from the existing Champlain Bridge. The 3335 m long bridge consists of three independent structures—one for northbound traffic, one for southbound traffic, and one for a transit corridor. The typical 50.255 m wide deck allows for 8 lanes of traffic, 2 lanes of a transit corridor, and a multiple-use-path. Each roadway deck consists of a constant depth, composite twin steel box girder with a precast concrete deck.

The 240 m cable supported main span crosses the St. Lawrence Seaway with a vertical clearance of 38.5 m above high water level. The three individual structures are connected by steel cross beams over the length of the main spans. The superstructure is supported by two planes of stay cables anchored in a twin leg pylon straddling the transit corridor. The lower pylon is made of precast, match-cast concrete segments, while the upper pylon is cast-in-place. The back span for the cable-stayed bridge is erected on falsework, and the main span is erected segmentally in one direction with a lifting system on the deck. The pylons and piers for the cable-stayed structure are supported on piles socketed into the rock.

The approach spans are continuous with four to seven spans per unit. The typical approach span length is 80.4 m. A 110 m span is required for crossing Route 132 at the east end of the bridge. The approach bridge is supported on unique piers with twin inclined legs. The pier legs are made of precast, match-cast concrete segments that are connected with post-tensioning tendons to a steel pier cap. The piers are supported on precast concrete spread footings keyed into the rock. The approach spans are erected with floating cranes. The steel girders are spliced to limit the maximum lifting weight at 85 t.

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